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Displaced people groups exist on every continent around the globe, and half of displaced people are children.

Tent Schools International comes alongside Christian leaders in refugee camps and other transitional areas to establish effective schools for displaced children.

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Empower displaced children 
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Video Release from Lebanon

Refugee children, parents and tent-school teachers share what education means to them in a new video release from Lebanon.

Roma School Serves Children in Ukraine

A classroom at the Roma School in Nagydobrony, Ukraine

NAGYDOBRONY, UKRAINE – A partnership with a school serving the Roma population in Eastern Europe has resulted in $4,000 in funding from Tent Schools International (TSI) for the school’s lunch program, school supplies, and a portion of teacher salaries.

The Roma (or Romani people), Europe’s largest minority group, has a history of forced assimilation and enslavement, and they continue to live in systemic poverty. When enrolled in mainstream European schools, Romani children tend to fall behind without the right awareness and support from educators. The Roma school began as a way to come alongside children who were struggling with their studies, and in response to what was becoming an educational crisis for Romani children living in western Ukraine.

Ukrainian nationals launched the school specifically for Romani students in 1998 in the village of Nagydobrony. The partnership with TSI (then Worldwide Christian Schools) began in 2003, when the organization sent funding for building renovations and teacher training in Roma language and culture. Now, 56 children are currently enrolled, and three of the classes are made up of students with special needs.

“Most of the pupils in grades one and two are here because they feel intimidated by the size of the public school, and are more easily integrated into the school system when they are among other children from the Roma community, especially at these younger ages,” wrote David Pandy-Szekeres, a TSI partner.

Gyöngyi, age 14

One of the Romani students is 14-year-old Gyöngyi, now in second grade. Gyöngyi’s parents enrolled her in school for the first time in spring of 2016 at the urging of the school’s director. She liked school immediately and was eager to return in September.

Lacking this clearance, Gyöngyi had to leave the school. She picked up her bag and walked out of the school yard, stopping at the gate to cry. As she made her way home, Gyöngyi grew determined. Within three days, she was back.

However, Gyöngyi quickly encountered a roadblock to her education. All of the Romani students attend the school as a program of the larger public school system, and the director of the public school established a requirement for the medical clearance of each child within the system.

Lacking this clearance, Gyöngyi had to leave the school. She picked up her bag and walked out of the school yard, stopping at the gate to cry. As she made her way home, Gyöngyi grew determined. Within three days, she was back.

“She turned up at the school enthusiastically waving her medical clearance certificate,” David wrote. “Gyöngyi is presently learning to write her name but is already very good with numbers. We hope her enthusiasm for learning continues!”

Thank you for your support in bringing education to Romani children in Ukraine!

Emily Klooster for Tent Schools International